Independent Administration with a Will

The probate process is primarily a method of changing title from the deceased to the person or persons who inherit the property.  Some assets require probate, such as real estate and bank accounts held only in the name of the deceased, while others do not, such as life insurance policies or retirement plans payable directly to named beneficiaries.

Find the Will.  Locating an original Will can sometimes be difficult.  Many people keep their Wills in a safe deposit box, while others keep them at home or some place else.  It may be a good idea to talk to your father and find out where his is kept.  If it's at the bank, be sure you're authorized to enter the box, otherwise it may be harder to get the Will out.

Hire a Lawyer.  Most of the time, it's necessary to hire a lawyer.  The judges in some smaller counties allow people to represent themselves in probate matters, but you still may have trouble preparing all the necessary forms that are required.  It's safe to say, therefore, that lawyers must be hired in the vast majority of cases.

Application For Probate.  The first document your lawyer will prepare is an application for probate.  The original Will is filed at the court house along with the application and a filing fee.  The application is usually several pages long, and it describes certain facts about your father, his Will, and his property.

The Probate Hearing.  After a ten day mandatory waiting period, a probate hearing will be held.  Your lawyer will schedule this hearing for you.  Under ideal circumstances, you can get your hearing two weeks after the application is filed.  However, it often takes three weeks or longer to schedule a hearing because of the backlog in the courts and other scheduling conflicts.  In larger counties, the hearings are held in a crowded courtroom, and dozens of cases are heard one after another.  In smaller counties, the hearings are often less formal, with the judge often shaking your hand at the door to his or her office, and then showing you to a chair right there in the office.

Testimony and Order.  At the hearing, your lawyer will ask you a number of routine questions.  Most of the time, the judge will then sign an order admitting the Will to probate.  The order is a document which your lawyer will have prepared and brought to the hearing.  You will also be asked to sign the written document containing your testimony.

The Oath.  After the hearing, you will need to sign an oath stating that you will fulfill your duties as independent executrix of your father's estate.   The word "independent" means that you will not need to ask the court for permission to sell estate assets or to conduct any other duties as executrix.

Letters Testamentary.  After your oath is filed, you will be able to order "letters testamentary" from the county clerk.  The letters will authorize you to close bank accounts and collect and claim other estate assets.  You can order as many letters as you think you will need.

Notices.  Within 30 days of receiving letters testamentary, you must publish a "notice to creditors" in a local newspaper.  This notice lets creditors of your father's estate know where they may file claims to recover money they are owed.  It must be published even if your father has no creditors.  Certified letters must also be sent to all of the charities named in your father's Will.  Proof that you performed these tasks must be filed with the court as well.

File the Inventory.  Within 90 days of qualifying as executrix, you must file an Inventory with the court.  The Inventory lists all the assets which pass under your father's Will.  Importantly, the inventory doesn't always list everything a person owns, since you don't have to list assets that pass directly to named beneficiaries.  For instance, life insurance, retirement plans, some joint accounts, and many other properties are designed to pass directly to a named beneficiary.  After the Inventory is filed, the judge will sign an order approving the Inventory.







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